Korean researchers unveil new superconductor PCPOSOS

 Professor Kim Hyun-tak presents on PCPOSOS at an American Physical Society session in Minneapolis in this file  photo captured from Petr Cermak's account on X, formerly known as Twitter, March 4. Yonhap

Professor Kim Hyun-tak presents on PCPOSOS at an American Physical Society session in Minneapolis in this file photo captured from Petr Cermak’s account on X, formerly known as Twitter, March 4. Yonhap

A group of Korean researchers, known for its controversial claim of creating the room-temperature superconductor LK-99, has newly unveiled its discovery of a new superconductor.

At an American Physical Society (APS) session in Minneapolis on Monday (U.S. time), professor Kim Hyun-tak of the College of William & Mary presented joint research on PCPOSOS, a material the researchers claim to be a room temperature and normal pressure superconductor, according to postings on X, formerly known as Twitter.

The presentation included claims that PCPOSOS exhibits zero resistance, the Meissner effect and partial levitation on a magnet. The Meissner effect refers to a superconducting state with zero electrical resistance and no magnetic fields from its interior.

He showed a magnified photo of a sample that levitates and floats completely above the magnet in certain situations and released a video clip of an experiment on levitation conducted at a lab called SCTL.

But the researcher did not disclose detailed information about the experiment and the lab.

Kim said he will publish the synthesis method for PCPOSOS on arXiv, an online preprint repository, later in the day.

Professor Kim Hyun-tak presents on PCPOSOS at an American Physical Society session in Minneapolis in this file photo captured from Petr Cermak's account on X, formerly known as Twitter, March 4. Yonhap

Professor Kim Hyun-tak presents on PCPOSOS at an American Physical Society session in Minneapolis in this file photo captured from Petr Cermak’s account on X, formerly known as Twitter, March 4. Yonhap

However, the Korean scientific community remains cautious, emphasizing the importance of rigorous verification processes before accepting Kim’s claims.

“It doesn’t mean that society has accepted it or that it has gone through the approval process,” said Choi Kyeong-dal, president of the Korean Society of Superconductivity and Cryogenics, adding that the presentation at an APS session does not equate to global academic approval.

He emphasized the necessity for independent verification to establish the credibility of Kim’s findings.

The unveiling of PCPOSOS came after a group of Seoul-based researchers posted papers on an online archive last year, claiming they had developed a superconductor that functions as a superconductor at ambient pressure and temperatures below 400 Kelvin, or 127 degree Celsius.

Superconductors are one of the most sought-after materials by science and technology researchers, through which electricity can move without encountering any resistance.

The creation of a room-temperature semiconductor would significantly reduce the energy costs of electronics, with a wide variety of everyday applications, from MRI machines to superfast maglev trains. But their use is highly limited because superconductivity can typically only be achieved at very cold temperatures or high pressures.

Since the paper was released, the LK-99 superconductor has won global attention and stirred up controversy over whether it is real.

The international and local science community has remained skeptical about the validity of LK-99, prompting efforts to verify its room-temperature, ambient-pressure capabilities. (Yonhap)

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